Editor on April 18th, 2014

(Thanks to Nancy Willard.  – Mike Tully)

The individuals who have the greatest insight into the quality of your school’s climate, the current challenges related to bullying, and the effectiveness of school efforts in reducing such hurtful behavior are walking around schools wearing jeans, with smart phones in their hands or pockets.

In March 2012, the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice entered into a consent decree with the Anoka Hennepin School District in Minnesota to resolve a lawsuit against the district based on gender-based harassment. The importance of student leadership was emphasized in the press release announcing this decree:

The Departments are especially grateful to the courageous students who came forward in this case and provided invaluable insights that strengthened the Decree. It explicitly provides opportunities for student participation in the District’s ongoing anti-harassment efforts.

MORE  >>>

Editor on April 17th, 2014

Bullying is having a significant impact on academic performance and is leading pupils to achieve lower grades at GCSE level, according to new research.

The Annual Bullying Survey, published by Brighton-based anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label, has highlighted a direct correlation between bullying and the negative impact it has on education.

The report points out areas of concern, those most at risk and the long-term impact bullying is having on the lives of millions of young people.

MORE  >>>

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A three-minute video suicide note posted on YouTube by a 16-year-old Louisville high school student who killed herself moments later left school officials scrambling Tuesday to try to protect other students from the ensuing social media frenzy.

The video was posted around 6 p.m. Monday, and by the next day, it had been watched and rewatched more than 10,000 times before it was taken down from YouTube about 4:30 p.m.

Worried officials at Jefferson County Public Schools shut down district network access to Twitter and YouTube…

MORE  >>>

A Pennsylvania teenager convicted of disorderly conduct for recording his alleged tormenters in class wants changes to the district’s zero tolerance policy rather than the wishes of his mother, who wants “heads to roll” for the incident.

Shea Love, 40, said her 15-year-old son, Christian, had long been victimized by fellow students in his special education math class at South Fayette High School in McDonald, Pa. So the frustrated sophomore made an audio recording of the alleged bullying using his iPad, which school officials forced him to delete upon learning of the 7-minute segment in February. He was later convicted of disorderly conduct and fined $25 plus court costs.

MORE  >>>

Editor on April 15th, 2014

(Thanks to Larry Magid.  – Mike Tully)

I’ve heard a lot of consternation about apps and sites that let users post anonymously and, indeed it is possible to use services like Whisper, Ask.FM, Secret, and Yik Yak to be annoying, mean, or downright cruel. But the same can be said for any tool that enables social interaction, whether it’s a social network, a phone, or even a place where people meet face-to-face. In fact, research has shown the in-person bullying is much more prominent than cyberbullying.

MORE  >>>

Editor on April 14th, 2014

(Thanks to the New York Times.  Question:  Is this restorative justice, or an update of the town square dock?  What do you think?  – Mike Tully)

SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio man who spent hours on a street corner Sunday with a sign declaring he’s a bully says that the punishment in a disorderly conduct case was unfair and that the judge who sentenced him has ruined his life.

Sixty-two-year-old Edmond Aviv mostly ignored honking horns and people who stopped by to talk with him in South Euclid, the Northeast Ohio Media Group reported http://bit.ly/1p0xNrR ).

“The judge destroyed me,” Aviv said. “This isn’t fair at all.”

MORE  >>>

Editor on April 14th, 2014

We know some of the tricks for teaching kids to become high achievers. For example, research suggests that when parents praise effort rather than ability, children develop a stronger work ethic and become more motivated.

Yet although some parents live vicariously through their children’s accomplishments, success is not the No. 1 priority for most parents.

MORE  >>>

Sexual harassment in the workplace has negative effects on both the employees who experience it and the organizations in which it takes place, said David Perecman, founder of The Perecman Firm, after a recently released study revealed that more than half of women said they had recently been harassed or bullied at work. The study also isolated the sectors where it was the worst, reported CNBC (4.2.14).

“Harassing conduct by managers, supervisors, and employees of any level, should not be tolerated. Workplaces must be free from harassment and bullying,” said Perecman.

According to the study, 52 percent of women said they’d been bullied and harassed at work over the past three years.

MORE  >>>

<<<  DOWNLOAD THE STUDY HERE  >>>

Editor on April 10th, 2014

Gov. Mark Dayton on Wednesday signed a bullying-prevention bill into law, creating a tough new set of rules for Minnesota schools to follow to protect students from being tormented by classmates.

The Safe and Supportive Schools Act replaced a 37-word anti-bullying law that was widely considered one of the nation’s weakest. Its passage came almost three years after the state’s largest school district was hit with a lawsuit that accused it of failing to protect students from being bullied.

“Nobody in this state or nation should have to feel bad about themselves for being who they are,” Dayton said. “This law says, ‘Not in Minnesota.’ ”

MORE  >>>

<<< CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE BILL >>>

Editor on April 10th, 2014

(Thanks to Nancy Willard.  – Mike Tully)

What schools are doing to stop bullying isn’t working.

It isn’t that most schools aren’t trying or don’t want to stop bullying. The problem is that what schools are doing isn’t effective.

In 2011, close to 1.2 million students reported that someone was hurtful to them at school once a week or more. This rate has not significantly declined since 2005. Of this number, over 540,000 students say this happens “almost daily.”

Further, over 700,000 students reported they were “fearful of attack or harm” at school “sometimes” or “most of the time.”

MORE  >>>

NOTE:  You can purchase a copy of Nancy Willard’s new book here:  CLICK TO PURCHASE